Rights Respecting School

North Ealing Primary School
Silver Accreditation

Rights Respecting Introduction

Unicef works with schools in the UK to create safe and inspiring places to learn, where children are respected, their talents are nurtured and they are able to thrive. The Rights Respecting Schools Award embeds these values in daily school life and gives children the best chance to lead happy, healthy lives and to be responsible, active citizens with a world view.

The SilverAward recognises our school’s achievement in putting the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child into practice within the school and beyond. We look forward to working together and pushing towards the gold level.

Pupils have a very good knowledge of their different rights and were able to cite a wide range of rights including: the right to a name, to an education, to be heard, to have clean water, to relax and play, to have shelter, to be safe, and the right to have rights. They showed good understanding that rights are universal and unconditional. “They’re yours and can’t be taken away” explained a child.

Pupil Voice is a strength of the school. Children know they are listened to and that their views are respected and valued.

The leadership team have a shared commitment to promote a culture of inclusion and respect for rights. There is a strong ethos based on agreed Learning Values which reflect the principles and values of the UNCRC.

Rights Respecting displays around the school:

Examples of children’s work:

This question was posted to Yr 6 children who have been studying the book ‘Once’:

Should Barney (a dentist) be treating the Nazi officer?

One child’s response was this:

If Barney is getting food for the children, then he should carry on doing it. Though the children have a right to be kept safe from danger, they also have a right to healthy food. In addition to this, Barney is a duty bearer (because he is an adult) and it is his responsibility to keep Felix and all the other children safe; if he is kind to the Nazis, the Nazis might be kind in return. However, the Nazis are all duty bearers too – they have been denying children’s rights for three years now. If the soldier was going to hurt them, Barney shouldn’t have brought Felix with him because Felix has the right to be protected from danger and Barney has the responsibility of making sure these rights are upheld for Felix as he is now in his care. Perhaps the soldier is a Nazi, going around shooting at people because he can. But maybe he was forced into joining the army and it wasn’t his choice. He’s still a human who needs dental health checkups.

THE A B C D E of Rights

A

RIGHTS ARE FOR ALL CHILDREN

B

RIGHTS ARE THERE AT BIRTH

C

RIGHTS CANNOT BE TAKEN AWAY

D

RIGHTS DO NOT HAVE TO BE EARNT

E

ALL RIGHTS ARE EQUALLY IMPORTANT

RRSA Assembly - 09.11.20

RRSA Assembly - 09.11.20

Suggested books for children to read which link to children’s rights:

  • I Have The Right to Be a Child by Alain Serres, illustrated by Aurélia Fronty
  • How To Look After Your Dinosaur by Jason Cockcroft
  • Kind by Alison Green, illustrated by Axel Scheffler
  • So Much! by Trish Cooke, illustrated by Helen Oxenbury
  • No! by David McPhail
  • There’s a Bear on My Chair by Ross Collins

For Upper KS2 children:

  • The Promise by Nicola Davies, illustrated by Laura Carlin
  • We Are All Born Free by Amnesty International
  • Kick by Mick Johnson
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